greek eggplant plus curly endives and beans

These dishes are beaut for meat-free days or simply as vegetable accompaniments. Don't like eggplants? My husband didn't either until he tasted them like this. Curly endive, if you've never had it, is a leafy lettuce-sorta-thing belonging to the chicory family. The leaves and stems can and should be eaten. It's delicious and very healthy. Do try.







greek eggplant in tomato sauce

1 large eggplant
extra virgin olive oil
2 tbsp tomato passata (to make yourself  see my recipe here) or 3 ripe tomatoes, skinned and finely chopped
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
a few sprigs fresh basil or oregano, roughly chopped
pinch of salt

Slice eggplant thinly either lengthways or into discs. Heat olive oil in a pan over medium heat and fry slices of eggplant until there is some colour on both sides. Add tomato passata or finely chopped tomatoes, garlic, herbs and salt to taste. Add enough water to create a sauce (about 1/2 cup), stir then lower heat and simmer until eggplant has cooked down and the sauce has thickened, about 20 minutes. Keep an eye on it and if the mixture is becoming too dry too quickly, add a splash of water.

This dish is terrific with thick crusty sourdough bread. It's possibly even better the next day. Can be eaten cold or hot.

curly endive and bean casserole

extra virgin olive oil
1 onion, finely diced
4 ripe tomatoes, skinned and roughly chopped
1 bunch curly endive, cleaned thoroughly and roughly chopped (stems and leaves)
1 cup Great Northern Beans, soaked in water overnight and boiled in fresh water until soft, about 40 minutes
pinch of salt and pepper

Heat olive oil in a large pot over a low heat. Add diced onion and sauté until soft but not coloured. Add tomatoes, chopped endive, the cooked beans and salt and pepper to taste. Stir well, then cover and let simmer, stirring occasionally to allow all the endive to wilt. Once all the endive has wilted, check to see if more liquid is needed. If so, add a splash of water or vegetable stock. Cover and let simmer until endive is cooked, about 15-20 minutes. Cooked endive should still have a slight bite to it, but not too much to the point where you get tired chewing.

This is great on its own, with the eggplant dish above or with free range roast pork.

Enjoy!

4 comments:

  1. I just made eggplant and it was divine! I didn't have any bread so I served it over pasta but I found myself almost picking around the pasta and just going for the good stuff. This will definitely be added to the weekly rotation. Thanks for posting :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. I love the dishes you show us, they are all so hearty and healthy (and make my mouth water:-)
    I think I will cook a big portion of this next week for my busy days...
    Johanna

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  3. These were delicious thank you! I didn't have endive for the bean dish so i just chucked in wild rocket that I had growing an it worked out a treat! The peppery taste of the rocket really complimented the dish. I can't wait to try some more of your recipes again!
    By the way, do you have any recommendations for where I can learn more about the Mediterranean diet?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Niki, actually I saw this cookbook at the bookstore the other day and thought it was quite good: http://www.booktopia.com.au/the-mediterranean-diet-catherine-itsiopoulos/prod9781742610825.html?gclid=CIrevreFgbsCFYUzpAodtiQAIg

      You might also be interested in this site: http://www.bluezones.com/live-longer/education/expeditions/ikaria-greece/ And here are their few videos on there about the greek diet: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL50D33297F0C8E692&feature=plcp

      Delete

 

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